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Monthly PRI Newsletters highlight upcoming talks and symposiums, job opportunities, a featured scholar profile, and more!

Congratulations to the first PRI postdoctoral fellows! July 7, 2021 Congratulations to the first PRI postdoctoral fellows!

We congratulate Daniel N. Anstett, Stephanie Schmiege and Brittni Kelley, the first Plant Resilience Institute Fellows. These post-doctoral fellows were selected on the basis of their excellence and breadth of approach to issues of plant resilience. Each Fellow will be associated with more than one lab and will develop independent projects studying plant resilience.

Spotting tar spot disease sooner July 7, 2021 Spotting tar spot disease sooner

PRI member Addie Thompson recently received a Bayer Grants4Ag $10,000 award to help farmers detect tar spot, a disease found in maize crops. Using drones equipped with remote sensing technology in the air and taking smartphone images on the ground, her research team is able to more quickly detect, predict and quantify spots.

Building better beans for the future May 17, 2021 Building better beans for the future

As climate change threatens global food security, PRI member and University Distinguished Professor Dr. Robin Buell is building better beans crucial to human nutrition by tapping into the genetics of the more heat-resistant tepary bean.

Study links energy metabolism to reduced fertility in overheated bean crops May 14, 2021 Study links energy metabolism to reduced fertility in overheated bean crops

A new study from the lab of interim PRI director Thomas Sharkey, finds that the activity levels of the carbon metabolism protein, G6PDH, are related to decreased production of pollen in bean flowers. As global temperatures rise, some bean crops, including Michigan-grown varieties, might be more sensitive to higher heat levels.

PLANTS AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS: WHAT'S MAKING PLANTS LOSE THEIR LUNCH? February 26, 2021 PLANTS AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS: WHAT'S MAKING PLANTS LOSE THEIR LUNCH?

A new study from the Walker lab, in collaboration with Thomas Sharkey, is shedding light on how plants could potentially become more efficient at photosynthesis. The long-term implications of this research range from improved agricultural productivity to predicting the effects of climate change. The study is published in the journal Plant Physiology.